Landscape Ecohydrology

Research group of Dörthe Tetzlaff
Understanding storage and pathways of water to predict and prevent major flooding. | Photo: Chris Soulsby

Understanding storage and pathways of water to predict and prevent major flooding. | Photo: Chris Soulsby

We aim to understand how catchments function ecohydrologically at different spatio-temporal scales; linking landscapes and riverscapes by understanding the physical processes that generate stream flow, and the way these processes influence the hydrochemistry and ecohydrology of streams. We integrate insights from both field and modelling approaches. Crucially, one of our main tools is the use of stable isotope tracers as “fingerprints” of waters to quantify internal processes of water storage, transmission and release. We integrate such data into models to parameterise ecohydrological interactions in a physically-based way to quantitatively assess the effects of climate and landuse change. At present, the group is pursuing a strong focus on monitoring of soil-vegetation-athmosphere-water dynamics through tracers and tracer-aided modelling to identify how plant water use will affect and possibly alter signals of potential climate change. We conduct international inter-catchment comparison using insights from different geographical environments to synthesise a more holistic understanding of hydrological and ecological function.

Most members of Tetzlaff’s group are still based at the University of Aberdeen as part of the ERC funded project VeWa.

Group members

Christine Sturm

Technician/Lab Operator
Working group
Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions
Landscape Ecohydrology

Grit Siegert

Technician/Lab Operator
Working group
Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions
Landscape Ecohydrology

Hauke Dämpfling

Technician/Lab Operator
Working group
Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions
Landscape Ecohydrology
Selected publications

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