Scientific highlights

Genome of the Prussian carp decoded | Evolution of toxins in phytoplankton | Danube: floodplains remove nitrate

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20 freshwater species that deserve our attention

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IPCC Report: What is the state of the inland waters?

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Research for the future of our freshwaters

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Our vision is the understanding of processes that shape the structure and functioning of water bodies and their biota. Our research findings help to predict responses to environmental change and to develop measures conductive to sustainable water management.

IGB is Germany’s largest and one of the leading international research centres for freshwaters. Here, hydrologists, biogeochemists, physicists, microbiologists, evolutionary ecologists, fish ecologists and fisheries biologists from all over the world are working under one roof.

News

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Global freshwater salinisation

Inland waters are becoming increasingly saline. An international research team with Stella Berger, Jens Nejstgaard from IGB and the AQUACOSM-plus consortium published an analysis of the present status of knowledge and propose a new research agenda on the topic.
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100 years of SIL

The International Society of Limnology (SIL) is celebrating its 100th anniversary with an international conference in Berlin. This is being hosted by IGB. 
press release

Bacterial community signatures reveal how cities urbanize water sources

 Urbanization introduces large amounts of nutrients, chemical pollutants and antimicrobial products, and thereby changes the makeup of the microbiome by favouring groups of bacteria that contain human pathogenic bacteria, with yet unknown consequences for ecosystem functioning and human and animal health.

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IGB Annual Research Report 2021

Results and developments from one year of freshwater research
 

Selected Publications

July 2022
Nature Communications. - 13(2022), Art. 4092

Equilibrated evolution of the mixed auto-/allopolyploid haplotype-resolved genome of the invasive hexaploid Prussian carp

Heiner Kuhl; Kang Du; Manfred Schartl; Lukáš Kalous; Matthias Stöck; Dunja K. Lamatsch

The Prussian carp or Gibel carp is considered one of the most successful invasive fish species in Europe. Its ability to reproduce asexually gives it a major advantage over competing fish. The authors have for the first time described the complete genome of the Prussian carp.This also provides a much better understanding of its unusual reproductive method and to improve its management. 

July 2022
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London : Ser. B, Biological Sciences. - 289(2022)1977, Art. 20220393

Evolution of toxins as a public good in phytoplankton

Elias Ehrlich; Uffe Høgsbro Thygesen; Thomas Kiørboe

The authors studied, with an individual-based phytoplankton model, how toxins can evolve and how intraspecific variation of toxicity can be maintained in toxic phytoplankton blooms. They found that small-scale spatial heterogeneity generated by binary division of phytoplankton cells can explain the evolution of toxins as a public good and the coexistence of toxic and non-toxic genotypes.

July 2022
Journal of Geophysical Research : Atmospheres. - 127(2022)12, Art. e2021JD036382

Multiple angle observations would benefit visible band remote sensing using night lights

Christopher C.M. Kyba; Martin Aubé; Salvador Bará; Andrea Bertolo; Constantinos A. Bouroussis; Stefano Cavazzani; Brian R. Espey; Fabio Falchi; Geza Gyuk; Andreas Jechow; Miroslav Kocifaj; Zoltán Kolláth; Héctor Lamphar; Noam Levin; Shengjie Liu; Steven D. Miller; Sergio Ortolani; Chun Shing Jason Pun; Salvador José Ribas; Thomas Ruhtz; Alejandro Sánchez de Miguel; Mathias Schneider; Ranjay Man Shrestha; Alexandre Simoneau; Chu Wing So; Tobias Storch; Kai Pong Tong; Milagros Tuñón; Diane Turnshek; Ken Walczak; Jun Wang; Zhuosen Wang; Jianglong Zhang

The authors propose that next generation night-time remote sensing missions should consider multiple angles for observations in the visible band. They demonstrate via modeling and examples how the proposed method would leverage light pollution studies and unlock new applications for night-time remote sensing.

July 2022
Communications Biology. - 5(2022), Art. 393

The rising moon promotes mate finding in moths

Mona Storms; Aryan Jakhar; Oliver Mitesser; Andreas Jechow; Franz Hölker; Tobias Degen; Thomas Hovestadt; Jacqueline Degen

The authors have shown for the first time that the moon plays a key role in the reproductive behaviour of male moths: when the moon rises on the horizon, they find females better and faster. Fortunately, they are not bothered by low levels of light pollution.

July 2022
Science of the Total Environment. - 843(2022), Art. 156879

The potential of large floodplains to remove nitrate in river basins: the Danube case

Martin Tschikof; Andreas Gericke; Markus Venohr; Gabriele Weigelhofer; Elisabeth Bondar-Kunze; Ute Susanne Kadene; Thomas Hein

Based on the modelling of nutrient fluxes in the Danube River Basin, the authors estimated the (potential) contribution of the large floodplains to remove nitrate from the Danube and major tributaries. The active floodplains retain 33000 tons per year, or 6.5% of the total nitrogen emissions, which can be increased by 5000 tons if floodplains and water bodies are reconnected.

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