Environmental Change

Lakes and rivers react extremely sensitively to climate change and environmental changes. As such, they act as an early warning system for global ecological change. Our long-term programmes at Lake Stechlin and the lake Müggelsee, as well as on the River Spree and the River Tagliamento in Italy document the consequences of this change. Data spanning several decades enables us to forecast how freshwaters will develop under certain scenarios. In the LakeLab, our globally unique experimental facility in Lake Stechlin, we simulate the impact that changing environmental conditions (e.g. extreme weather events or the increasing use of artificial lighting) have on lakes and aquatic organisms.

Vice versa, freshwaters also have an impact on climate change. They have the ability to store or release large quantities of greenhouse gases such as methane and carbon dioxide. We investigate which conditions influence these processes and what role is played by rivers, lakes and wetlands in the global carbon cycle.

Related News

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IGB contributes to IPCC report

Professor Rita Adrian is engaged in the long-term and climate impact research of lake ecosystems at IGB. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has selected her as a lead author of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), which is due to be released in 2021/22.
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Climate gases from water bodies

As the earth warms up, our bodies of water can release more methane and carbon dioxide. It is a vicious circle in which climate change itself intensifies. Researchers at IGB investigate the processes that lead to this release of greenhouse gases.

Related Projects

Long-term effects of invasive species in novel communities (InDyNet)

Invasion biology has addressed or even solved several key questions about biological invasions, but the central issue of long-term effects of invasive species has remained critically unexplored. Several case studies exist about long-term population dynamics of invasive species and their impacts, but a general synthesis or understanding is currently lacking. This knowledge gap is critical, as long-term shifts in invader population densities and traits are likely and may have large consequences of ecological and economic interest. This project aims to narrow the knowledge gap.
Contact person
Jonathan Jeschke
Florian Ruland
Department
(Dept. 2) Ecosystem Research
Start
01/2015
End
12/2018
Topic

Periphyton

Is a mismatch between periphyton and macrophyte development in spring crucial for submerged macrophyte recolonization in eutrophic shallow lakes?
Contact person
Sabine Hilt
Department
(Dept. 2) Ecosystem Research
Start
01/2016
End
12/2018
Topic

Experts at IGB

Rita Adrian

Head of Department
Working group
Long-term and Climate Impact Research of Lake Ecosystems

Stella A. Berger

Research Group Leader
Working group
Experimental Phytoplankton Ecology

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