Scientific highlights

Competition changes response to environmental change | Management of multiple stressors | Ice cover and climate change

Photo: Michael Feierabend
Press release

Large aquatic animals are at risk due to the loss of free-flowing rivers

Photo: David Ausserhofer/IGB
IGB Policy Brief

German federal elections: Researchers recommend a more sustainable water policy

Photo: Michel Roggo
Press release

Global warming: lakes lose too much oxygen

Photo: Lake Stechlin | © Michael Feierabend

Research for the future of our freshwaters

 Our profile

Our vision is the understanding of processes that shape the structure and functioning of water bodies and their biota. Our research findings help to predict responses to environmental change and to develop measures conductive to sustainable water management.

IGB is Germany’s largest and one of the leading international research centres for freshwaters. Here, hydrologists, biogeochemists, physicists, microbiologists, evolutionary ecologists, fish ecologists and fisheries biologists from all over the world are working under one roof.

News

insight

New year, new structure, new design

The beginning of 2022 marks a special milestone for IGB, because a lot has changed: We have restructured our departments and recruited two excellent heads for the management board. At the same time, new programme areas are being prepared. And we have also made a visual change.
focus

"We are looking at the bigger picture of biodiversity"

Sonja Jähnig has been appointed Head of Department at IGB since 1 January 2022. In an interview, the professor talks about her personal goals, what each of us really should know about rivers and lakes, and why water bodies are often overlooked.

Selected Publications

December 2021
Journal of Applied Ecology. - 58(2021)9, 1933-1944

Increased sediment deposition triggered by climate change impacts freshwater pearl mussel habitats and metapopulations

Damiano Baldan; Jens Kiesel; Christoph Hauer; Sonja C. Jähnig; Thomas Hein

The authors investigated the influence of climate change on the river pearl mussel through a coupled, complex model cascade in the catchment area of the Aist (Austria). Discharge changes might lead to reduced sediment transport capacity and to increased fine sediment input. As a consequence the mussel's dispersal probability decreases to up to 76% of the maximum theoretical value. 

December 2021
PLoS Biology. - 19(2021)8, e3001365

PhyloFisher: a phylogenomic package for resolving eukaryotic relationships

Alexander K. Tice; David Žihala; Tomáš Pánek; Robert E. Jones; Eric D. Salomaki; Serafim Nenarokov; Fabien Burki; Marek Eliáš; Laura Eme; Andrew J. Roger; Antonis Rokas; Xing-Xing Shen; Jürgen F. H. Strassert; Martin Kolísko; Matthew W. Brown

The authors developed a user-friendly software tool (“PhyloFisher”) for phylogenomic analyses of eukaryotes. This software package aids in the construction and curation of protein sequence-based datasets, conducts post-assembly analyses, and allows visualisation of the results.

December 2021
Systematic Biology. - 71(2022)1, 105–120

Phylogenomic insights into the origin of primary plastids

Iker Irisarri; Jürgen F. H. Strassert; Fabien Burki

Did primary plastids originate by a single or multiple endosymbiosis events between a heterotrophic host eukaryote and cyanobacteria? By using a phylogenomic approach to untangle the diversification of the primary plastid-bearing lineages (Archaeplastida), the authors propose a single endosymbiosis but highlight and discuss the affiliation of the plastid-lacking Picozoa to the Archaeplastida.

December 2021
Scientific Reports. - 11(2021), Art. 23518

Competition alters species’ plastic and genetic response to environmental change

Lynn Govaert; Luis J. Gilarranz; Florian Altermatt

The authors exposed three freshwater ciliates to long-term selection of increasing salinity in the absence and presence of competitors. Their results show that the evolutionary and plastic responses to increasing salinity depended both on interspecific competition and the magnitude of the abiotic salinity change, ultimately determining species persistence.

December 2021
Proceedings of the Royal Society of London : Ser. B, Biological Sciences. - 288(2021)1959, Art. 20210803

Genomic regions associated with adaptation to predation in Daphnia often include members of expanded gene families

Xiuping Zhang; David Blair; Justyna Wolinska; Xiaolin Ma; Wenwu Yang; Wei Hu; Mingbo Yin

The authors investigated the genetic basis underpinning the adaptation of prey to predation. The expansion of multiple gene families might be a key evolutionary event for Daphnia to survive in a habitat containing predators. For example, the expansions of gene families associated with chemoreception and vision allow Daphnia to enhance detection of predation risk.

Monitoring Stations

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Last measurement: No data available.
  • Water temperature
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  • Oxygen (rel./abs.)
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Last measurement: No data available.
  • Water temperature
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  • Oxygen (rel./abs.)
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  • Wind speed
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Last measurement: No data available.

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