Scientific highlights

Less makrophytes due to heat waves | Prey division in striped marlin | Phosphorus recycling from sewage sludge

Photo: © Solvin Zankl
Interview

10th anniversary of the LakeLab

© Andreas Jechow/IGB
Press release

The highest-resolution map of the world’s river systems ever produced

© Sami Domisch/IGB
Press release

Lessons learned from the River Oder disaster: researchers’ recommendations to policymakers and public authorities

© Luc De Meester/IGB

Research for the future of our freshwaters

 Our profile

Our vision is the understanding of processes that shape the structure and functioning of water bodies and their biota. Our research findings help to predict responses to environmental change and to develop measures conductive to sustainable water management.

IGB is Germany’s largest and one of the leading international research centres for freshwaters. Here, hydrologists, biogeochemists, physicists, microbiologists, evolutionary ecologists, fish ecologists and fisheries biologists from all over the world are working under one roof.

Selected Publications

November 2022
Environmental Pollution. - 308(2022), Art. 119627

Large-scale sampling of the freshwater microbiome suggests pollution-driven ecosystem changes

Katrin Premke ... Katja Felsmann ... Sibylle Schroer ... Eric Hübner ...Christopher C.M. Kyba; Michael T. Monaghan; Franz Hölker

Citizen scientists sampled more than 600 freshwaters in Germany. This unique data set provides evidence of 3 trends: first, microorganisms in the sediment show signs of chemical stress and antibiotic resistance in their genetic material. Second, excessive artificial lighting at night alters the species composition of  microorganisms. And third, all studied water bodies emit greenhouse gases. 

November 2022
Communications Biology. - 5(2022), Art. 1161

Mechanisms of prey division in striped marlin, a marine group hunting predator

M.J. Hansen; S. Krause; F. Dhellemmes; K. Pacher; R.H.J.M. Kurvers; P. Domenici; J. Krause

The authors identified individual striped marlin (Kajikia audax) hunting in groups. Groups surrounded prey but individuals took turns attacking. They found that competition for prey access led to an unequal division of prey among the predators, with 50% of the most frequently attacking marlin capturing 70–80% of the fish.

November 2022
Ecological monographs. - 92(2022)4, Art. e1531

Quantifying eco-evolutionary contributions to trait divergence in spatially structured systems

Lynn Govaert; Jelena H. Pantel; Luc De Meester

In both time and space, the observed differentiation in trait values among populations and communities can be the result of interactions between ecological and evolutionary processes. The authors extended methods to quantify ecological and evolutionary contributions to trait changes to account for empirical studies that document trait differentiation among populations structured in space.

November 2022
Science of the Total Environment. - 854(2022), Art. 158670

Towards the outwelling hypothesis in a Patagonian estuary: first support from lipid markers and bacterial communities

Germán A. Kopprio; Ana Martínez; Anna Fricke; Michael Hupfer; Rubén J. Lara; Martin Graeve; Astrid Gärdes

Fatty acid markers, stable isotopes of C and N, and bacterial communities were investigated in a mesotidal estuary of the Patagonia to assess the Odum’s outwelling hypothesis. Rhodobacterales were likely early colonizers of the outwelled organic matter and the exportation of nutrients and organisms and their essential fatty acids from the wetland was inferred, supporting the findings of Odum.

November 2022
Nature Communications. - 13(2022), Art. 6419

The emergence and development of behavioral individuality in clonal fish

Kate L. Laskowski; David Bierbach; Jolle W. Jolles; Carolina Doran; Max Wolf

The authors have now shown for the first time in naturally clonal fish that genetically identical individuals already differ in their character traits on the first day of life and that these early character differences significantly shape the behavior of the animals into adulthood. 

Colloquia

1. Dec
colloquium

Dr. Ingrid Chorus

Does eutrophication control need to include nitrogen? If so, under which conditions?

Videos

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(Bio)diversity at IGB

Biodiversity is the variety and variability of life on our Planet. It serves multiple functions in regulating chemistry of the atmosphere, water supply, production of biomass and recycling essential nutrients. At IGB we study various ecological aspects of biodiversity directly related to freshwater ecosystems such as lakes, rivers, groundwaters and wetlands. Our research is focused on a wide spectrum of aquatic organisms, ranging from microscopic life forms to fish, birds and mammals. IGB is extremely diverse in the methodologies of its multidisciplinary biodiversity studies. And of course, research at IGB is carried out by diverse international teams. 

Monitoring Stations

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